CO2 Generator



  • Probably dumb question but be prepared -- I'll have plenty more dumb ones to follow :-). The CO2 generator -- just leave this in the bag/box or take out the organic matter and put THAT in the box? I'm not sure and don't want to mess it up...leaving the mass in plastic intuitively doesn't seem like it would affect much, but I suppose the CO2 could pass through...I dunno. Hence the dumb question :-).


  • @DJ Leave in the box and set in your bloom (on the shelf to the left of the humidifier is a good place for it). Thanks for the questions. @BloomCS let's make sure we get big, clear directions on that! Thanks!


  • Not a dumb question at all and this just helps us to know that we need better instructions for these! Thanks for the feedback :)


  • Reposting @JT's information on CO2 Bags:

    Some info about why we add CO2 and what to expect.

    Bringing CO2 Into Your Indoor Garden

    Adding More CO2 to Plants -
    How Much CO2 do Plants Need?

    Fresh air contains carbon dioxide at about 370 ppm, so providing adequate ventilation and air movement is a good first step. Unfortunately, in a tightly enclosed greenhouse or growroom, ambient CO2 can get used up quickly. For example, in a plastic greenhouse, CO2 levels can be reduced to less than 200 ppm just 1-2 hours after sunrise. At levels below 200 ppm, plant growth will be greatly limited, and at levels below 100 ppm, plants will stop growing altogether.

    Carbon dioxide levels above ambient levels can have a dramatically positive effect on plant growth. By increasing carbon dioxide levels to 750-1,500 ppm, growers can expect a 30-50% increase in yields over ambient CO2 levels and time to fruiting and flowering can be reduced by 7-10 days.

    More for geeks:

    CO2 in Indoor Gardens